news from the mill

Dec 2018 pic 1.jpg

Mill stones encased in wooden tun or vat

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Grain is fed into the mill stones by the shoe

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Setting up for Santa's Workshops 

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The original Hurst Frame

For Open Days please see Events

We know lots of people are interested in the restoration of the mill and finding out more about it's history, so with this in mind we have compiled our Kersey Mill newsletter to keep you up to date with our findings and progress.

 

We have also listed our current newletter along with an opportunity to

see some of our archived posts.

 

If you have any stories or pictures you would like to include on any future newletters please click here to email us directly.

We would like to sincerly thank Historic England for giving a grant towards the costs involved with these repairs.

Friends of Kersey Mill Newsletters.....

April 2021

Drive it Day - Sunday 25th April - Report by Charlotte Vowden

KERSEY MILL WELCOMES CLASSIC CAR ENTHUSIASTS WITH HEARTY BREAKFASTS AND BUMPER BURGERS, SAYS CHARLOTTE VOWDEN.

Kersey Mill in Suffolk has been a local landmark since the early 19th century. Built in 1810 on the banks of the River Brett near Hadleigh its commanding four-storey structure, and the former maltings that stand beside it, are hidden from the main road on approach. 

Trees conspire to keep its presence a secret, which is no aid to navigation for newcomers, but in recent years it has become a place that people will go out of their way to visit – especially when there’s a classic and vintage car meet. On Drive It Day, for a small fee that’s put towards the mill’s restoration, owners of a more mature motor are welcome to turn up, park up and take part. 

Once inside the 18-acre estate, on a quiet sunny morning, it’s hard to imagine the cacophony of engines and human activity that a pop-up automotive Narnia can create. As the mill’s timber bones creak gently in the warmth, honey bees dart from flower to flower. It's a peaceful and pretty spot. 

Beyond the mill, there are brooks and streams and gardens to explore, as well as a community of independent gift shops, boutiques and businesses. Book ahead to channel your creative side with a teddy bear building or glass painting workshop in the craft studio. 

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For early birds, The Miller’s Kitchen cafe serves breakfast from 8.30am. The sausage, bacon and egg bap with a choice of tea, coffee or juice is £6 well spent, but consider it a warm-up for afternoon tea which comes with finger sandwiches, fresh-baked fruit and cheese scones plus a tempting selection of homemade cakes. The Miller’s 12oz special beef burger is a less dainty, but just as delicious (and filling) alternative.

In the not too distant future, owners Steve and Alison de Lara-Bell expect Kersey Mill to be producing its own flour again. Bringing the mill back to life in this way was the couple's ultimate goal when they bought it in a derelict state ten years ago, saving it from being developed into residential dwellings.

“It’s important to restore the past for the future,” says Steve, whose son Charlie runs the cafe. Sharing their vision, he's looking forward to adding artisan bread made with flour milled metres from his oven to the menu.


Words Charlotte Vowden Twitter | Instagram
Photography Charlotte Vowden / Kersey Mill

Click below for archived monthly newsletters

A family visit from overseas 

Tragedy at the mill

Wildlife wonders

A specialists view

The Waterwheel turns after 70 years

A look back at some of the people who lived at the mill

Work starts on the wheel

Welcome to our first newsletter